There’s Nothing More Autumnal Than Books and Rain

“If the trend toward bureaucratization and mechanization continues, I predict a revolution, not by librarians, but by readers—townspeople, students, and teachers—those who use the library in their need for knowledge and delight, who think of the library as a kind of temple, and who sicken of social scientists and personal psychologists of documentalists and gadgeteers, in places of power."

The Delights of Summer Reading, or Why We Take a Book to the Beach

by Amanda C. R. Clark People often tell me in hushed tones that they delight in book sniffing. These confessions are wrapped in happy, faux-guilt-laden shrugs of pleasure. There’s something magical in that almond and vanilla odor that wafts from books,[1] with pages sometimes yellow-edged, finger-smudged, marred by the occasional coffee or wine ring, a … Continue reading The Delights of Summer Reading, or Why We Take a Book to the Beach

Musings on a Christian Theory of Everything: Books in Temporal History

by Amanda C.R. Clark My friend and scholar Dr. Eric Cunningham recently wrote a chapter in Becoming Beholders (Liturgical Press, 2014), titled “Beholding the Eschaton,” which is an exploration of, as he writes, “an apocalyptic, psychedelic, postmodern guide to transcending the historical world, including some practical exercises on how to avoid becoming a zombie at … Continue reading Musings on a Christian Theory of Everything: Books in Temporal History

Sacred Bones & Golden Arms: The Art of Christian Spirituality

by Amanda C. R. Clark, Ph.D. In the Sant’Ignazio di Loyola church in Rome, entire walls are wreathed with relics in a macabre tapestry. Stretching high is a mosaic of skulls and bones, gold leaf, and red felt, offering a commentary on mortality and a reminder that the Church is, as Tertullian said, “built on … Continue reading Sacred Bones & Golden Arms: The Art of Christian Spirituality